Steve Martin on Slow Success

Steve Martin (via Guardian UK)Short and sweet today: a few of my favorite passages from Steve Martin's Born Standing Up: A Comics Life (published in 2007, currently $2.99 on Kindle). I had no idea how much I would love this book — two thumbs up, and definitely worth a read!

On the slow build:

I did stand-up comedy for eighteen years. Ten of those years were spent learning, four years were spent refining, and four were spent in wild success."

On not necessarily enjoying every waking moment (a la the pressure to "do what you love"):

My most persistent memory of stand-up is of my mouth being in the present and my mind being in the future: the mouth speaking the line, the body delivering the gesture, while the mind looks back, observing, analyzing, judging, worrying, and then deciding when and what to say next. Enjoyment while performing was rare—enjoyment would have been an indulgent loss of focus that comedy cannot afford."

On incremental progress:

I was seeking comic originality, and fame fell on me as a by-product. The course was more plodding than heroic: I did not strive valiantly against doubters but took incremental steps studded with a few intuitive leaps. I was not naturally talented—I didn't sing, dance or act—though working around that minor detail made me inventive. I was not self-destructive, though I almost destroyed myself. In the end, I turned away from stand-up with a tired swivel of my head and never looked back, until now."

On consistent practice and improvement:

The consistent work enhanced my act. I learned a lesson: It was easy to be great. Every entertainer has a night when everything is clicking. These nights are accidental and statistical: Like lucky cards in poker, you can count on them occurring over time. What was hard was to be good, consistently good, night after night, no matter what the abominable circumstances."

Steve Martin (via Muppet Wikia)